4

I met a couple of repentistas, street performers, in downtown Sao Paulo. They were two musicians with a tambou- rine to keep the beat, they sing one verse at a time, sometimes improvised. During my stay in Sao Paulo, I went to see them perform almost everyday. One day I thought maybe I could show them my work and ask them to make a song about its meaning, not my intentions for it, but their own interpretation of it. They only spoke Portuguese so our conversation didn’t go so well, but they grinned when I showed them my octopus video. With hardly any practice or conversations about it, they begun singing. I secretly hoped that their interpretation of the video would be different, that they would misconstrue it in a funny and beautiful way. In their song, I was a strange fisherman, not an artist.

Later, a Brazilian friend told me that the repentistas spoke a dialect that was difficult for someone from Sao Paulo to understand. So I decided that in the Japanese and English subtitles, I would use a dialect spoken in Western Japan. By the way, the name of their group, “Peneira & Sonhador,” translates as “A Colander & a Day Dreamer”.